Women

Detaining Families: A Study of Asylum Adjudication in Family Detention

Report Author: 
Ingrid Eagly, Esq., Steven Shafer, Esq. & Jana Whalley, Esq.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Aug

The United States currently detains more protection-seeking families than any nation in the world. Since 2001, parents and their children have been held at various times in five different detention facilities in New Mexico, Texas, and Pennsylvania, as they seek asylum in the United States. The number of detention beds reserved exclusively for families has ballooned since the first facility opened in 2001. Between 2001 and 2016, capacity reserved exclusively for detaining families increased by an astronomical 3,400 percent.

Source Organization: 
American Immigration Council

What Works: Innovative Approaches to Improving Refugee Integration

Report Author: 
Silva Mathema
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The Trump administration has proposed funding cuts to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP), which will destabilize the current infrastructure for resettling and integrating refugees.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

Addressing behavioral health disparities for Somali immigrants through group cognitive behavioral therapy led by community health workers

Report Author: 
Pratt, R., Ahmed, M., Noor, S., Sharif, H., Raymond, N., & Williams, C
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Dec

Community health workers have the potential to be utilized in a wide range of contexts, including to reduce mental health disparities among immigrant and refugee communities. This study examined the mental health outcomes for a group of Somali women in Minnesota, who come from a community where Western mental health services are often viewed as "a last resort". The women participated in a group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered by trained Somali women community health workers.

Source Organization: 
Other

Gender-Based Violence against Women: Both Cause for Migration and Risk along the Journey

Report Author: 
Anja Parish
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Sep

This brief addresses gender-based violence that may cause women to migrate, as well as the prevalence of such violence along the journey and the vulnerable position female migrants are in when arriving in a country of first asylum.  The author notes that increasingly rape and sexual violence have become military strategies, often used within a single country when there are multiple factions fighting for control.  Evidence is presented from all over the world,

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

The Perils of Expedited Removal: How Fast-Track Deportations Jeopardize Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Kathryn Shepherd & Royce Bernstein Murray
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 May

This paper documents what is happening to women and children crossing the U.S.-Mexico border and seeking asylum in the U.S. For the most part, they are fleeing horrific violence in Central America. Using information drawn from thousands of cases of families detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas, this report illustrates the difficulties these asylum seekers are having navigating the fast-track removal process known as expedited removal.

Source Organization: 
Other

How are Refugees Faring: Integration at U.S. and State Levels

Report Author: 
Michael Fix, Kate Hoper, and Jie Zong
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

This study looks at the educational and economic outcomes of five refugee communities (Vietnamese, Cuban, Russian, Iraqi and Burmese) in four states (California, Florida, New York and Texas).  The key question is whether the location of refugee resettlement has a significant impact on refugee integration.  This has been described as “the lottery effect” – the idea that refugees’ lives are impacted by being placed in locales with very different labor markets, costs of living and social safety nets.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Immigrant Health-Care Workers in the United States

Report Author: 
Szilvia Altorjai and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jun

With health-care reform high on the legislative agenda and the implications of immigration policy changes on particular populations in the news, the role of the foreign born in medical occupations has become a topic of intense interest. Immigrants represent a significant slice of this labor force, comprising almost 17 percent of the 12.4 million people in the United States working as doctors, nurses, dentists, and in other health-care occupations in 2015.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

On the Clock: How Immigrants Fill Gaps in the Labor Market by Working Nontraditional Hours

Report Author: 
Pavel Dramski, PhD
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Jul

A new study from New American Economy shows that of the 30.2 million workers in America working the night shift, weekends, or other unusual working hours, nearly 5.5 million of them are foreign-born. The findings of the report are based on an analysis of the American Community Survey (ACS) and the American Time Use Survey (ATUS).

 

 

Source Organization: 
Other

Missing Out: Refugee Education in Crisis

Report Author: 
The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR)
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Sep

This report tells the stories of some of the world's six million refugee children and adolescents under UNHCR's mandate who are of primary and secondary school-going age between 5 and 17. In addition, it looks at the educational aspirations of refugee youth eager to continue learning after secondary education. Education data on refugee enrolments and population numbers is drawn from UNHCR's population data base, reporting tools and education surveys. The data refers to the 2015-16 school year.

Source Organization: 
Other

The Evolving and Diversifying Nature of Migration to the U.S.-Mexican Border

Report Author: 
Jessica Bolter
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Feb

Due to historically low levels of Mexican migration in recent years, unauthorized migrants through the southern border are now more likely to come from Central American countries, such as El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, as well as from countries in the Caribbean, Asia and Africa. This article argues that policy changes are necessary given the growing diversity of arrivals. The majority of new arrivals, particularly those from Cuba and Haiti, are trying to seek admission through official border crossings rather than trying to evade detection.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

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