National

Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Michelangelo Landgrave
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

"Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin" uses American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau to analyze incarcerated immigrants according to their citizenship and legal status for 2016. The data show that all immigrants—legal and illegal—are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans relative to their shares of the population.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States

Report Author: 
David A. Leblang, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Although immigration reform has proved elusive for more than forty years, presidents from both parties have issued crucial executive actions that regulate inflows of new immigrants and the status of those already in the US. "Temporary Protected Status and Immigration to the United States" focuses on a particular class of executive actions, those related to granting immigrants Temporary Protected Status (TPS), exploiting the fact that immigrants who hold TPS receive access to the formal US labor market regardless of their legal status.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Governance for the Twenty-First Century

Report Author: 
Ruth Ellen Wasem
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Arguing that "immigration is not a program to be administered" but rather "a phenomenon to be managed," Ruth Ellen Wasem, former immigration specialist for the Congressional Research Service and now a Professor of Public Policy at the University of Texas, reviews the "checkered past" of immigration policy over the last century and, despite numerous efforts to reform the system, the "fragmented" and "diffuse" nature of immigration governance today. "Today the US system of immigration governance," she writes, "is scattered across the federal government, with no clear chain of command..."

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations

Report Author: 
Monica Anderson & Phillip Connor
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

More than a million sub-Saharan Africans have migrated to the United States and Europe since 2010. Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations by the Pew Research Center analyzed data from the United Nations, the U.S. Census Bureau's 2015 American Community Survey and Eurostat's 2015 Labor Force Survey to offer a current portrait of these migrants.

Source Organization: 
Pew Research Center

Foot Voting, Decentralization, and Development

Report Author: 
Ilya Somin
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

In "Foot Voting, Decentralization, and Development," legal scholar Ilya Somin reconceptualizes migration as a form of voting - a way for people to realize their potential in places more conducive to economic development. Such places may be states or regions within countries, or other countries. "Foot voting," according to the author, even has major advantages over regular ballot box voting.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Other

Growing Superdiversity among Young U.S. Dual Language Learners and Its Implications

Report Author: 
Maki Park, Jie Zong, & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The United States is quickly becoming a more diverse nation, thanks in part to the increasing number of children born with at least one parent who speaks a language other than English. Growing Superdiversity among Young U.S. Dual Language Learners and Its Implications finds that these children, often referred to as Dual Language Learners (or DLLs), now account for almost one-third of all children in the United States between the ages of 0 and 8. Using data from the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Collaboration in Support of New Americans

Report Author: 
Jen Vanek, Heide Wrigley, Erik Jacobson, & Janet Isserlis
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Apr

The Open Door Collective (ODC) is a network of concerned professionals dedicated to reshaping U.S. society to reduce levels of poverty and economic inequality. ODC members believe that adult education and lifelong learning are important tools in this quest, especially because adults with low literacy, numeracy, and English language skills, are much more likely to live in poverty.

Source Organization: 
Other

Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation

Report Author: 
Melina Juárez, Bárbara Gómez-Aguiñaga & Sonia P. Bettez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

"Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation" argues that corporate interests, specifically CoreCivic and the GEO group - two companies that operate nine out of the 10 largest immigrant detention centers in the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Freezing Out Justice: How Immigration Arrests at Courthouses are Undermining the Justice System

Report Author: 
American Civil Liberties Union
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Since the beginning of the Trump administration, immigration authorities have significantly increased their enforcement activities at courthouses - by 1,200 percent in New York in 2017 alone.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Detention, Inc.

Report Author: 
Denise Gilman & Luis A. Romero
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Some 350,000 immigrants are detained each year by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and about 30,000 immigrants are in detention on any day. Private prison corporations increasingly manage and profit from rising immigrant detention. Managing immigrant detention is a money-making business for corporations like the GEO Group, which opened a family detention facility in 2014 and soon after had $30 million in increased quarterly profits. The CoreCivic prison company had $245 million in revenue in one year from family detention.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

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