National

DHS Overestimates Visa Overstays for 2016: Overstay Population Growth Near Zero During the Year

Report Author: 
Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

In 2017, the Department of Homeland Security released a report on visa overstays, i.e. non-immigrants admitted to the United States on temporary visas, e.g. visitors, students, who had not departed the country by the expiration date of their authorized stay. The report found that there were 628,799 people in this category in 2016 and provided detailed breakdowns by country of origin. This paper assesses the credibility of these estimates for 133 countries by comparing them to estimates derived by the Center for Migration Studies of New York using a different methodology.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Coming to America

Report Author: 
Ann Morse
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Despite the prominence of immigration in the national political discourse, there has been little federal legislative action on immigration, and Americans know surprisingly little about immigrants and the U.S. immigration system.

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Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration and the War on Crime: Law and Order Politics and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996

Report Author: 
Patrisia Macías-Rojas
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This study focuses on events leading up to the passage of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) of 1996 that recast undocumented immigration as a crime and fused immigration enforcement with crime control. The author suggests that the act may have had less to do with immigration and more to do with "crime politics and the policies of mass incarceration" that dominated the national discourse in the 25 years preceding passage of the act.

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Source Organization: 
Other

What We Know and Need to Know About Immigrant Access to Justice

Report Author: 
Ellinor R. Jordan
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Oct

This article begins by presenting a review of research on the impact of legal representation in removal cases. A consistent finding is that the amount and quality of representation play a marked role in the outcome of hearings. Litigants without representation or with poor representation are much more likely to be removed and moreover, to not fully understand the implications of pleas and agreements they may make. The author suggests that in addition to poor outcomes for litigants, this situation reduces the overall efficiency of the justice system.

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Other

Middle Eastern and North African Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Mattea Cumoletti and Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This report updates a 2015 MPI profile of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) immigrants. These immigrants now represent 3 percent of the approximately 44 million immigrants in the U.S. The report discusses the socioeconomic characteristics of the MENA population as gleaned from census and other data. Each data point is compared with the immigrant population in general and the native-born population. For example, in 2016, 43 percent of MENA immigrants (ages 25 and above) had a bachelor's degree or higher, compared to 30 percent of all immigrants and 32 percent of native-born adults.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

What the Data Tells Us About Immigrant Executives in the U.S.

Report Author: 
Sami Mahroum and Rashid Ansari
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Nov

Google's Sergey Brin and Tesla's Elon Musk provide just two modern examples of well-known immigrant CEOs; however, despite the long history of immigrant contributions to American business, little research has been done to better understand the role of immigrant leadership in corporate America.

Source Organization: 
Other

DREAM Act-Eligible Poised to Build on the Investments Made in Them

Report Author: 
Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Political debate has intensified over "Dreamers" -- immigrants who were brought to the United States as children without authorization. In this paper, Donald Kerwin and Robert Warren from the Center for Migration Studies argue that granting Dreamers a path to citizenship would capitalize on the educational investments already made in them and boost their already high economic productivity.

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Other

How Might Restricting Immigration Affect Social Security's Finances

Report Author: 
Damir Cosic and Richard W. Johnson
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Most economists agree that immigration boosts productivity, raises the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and prevents labor shortages. In 2016, one in six workers in the United States was an immigrant. These immigrant workers finance a major share of Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) payroll taxes that fund Social Security.

Source Organization: 
The Urban Institute

Power of the Purse: How Sub-Saharan Africans Contribute to the U.S. Economy

Report Author: 
New American Economy
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

This brief provides timely information on the economic contributions of sub-Saharan African Immigrants, a group that has been given relatively little attention in immigration research. A major theme is that African immigrants are making contributions larger than their numbers would suggest. The authors calculate that, in 2015, African immigrants had approximately $40.3 billion in spending power and paid $14.8 billion in federal, state, and local taxes. African immigrants tend to be in their prime working age and have a much higher labor force participation rate than U.S.

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Source Organization: 
Other

New Opportunities? ESSA and Its Implications for Dual Language Learners and ECEC Workforce Development

Report Author: 
Delia Pompa, Maki Park and Michael Fix
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act in 2015, the successor legislation to the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, provides new opportunities to integrate early childhood education and care (ECEC) with K-12 education. This has special importance for dual language learners who now represent 32 percent of all children under the age of 5.  This report details all of the mechanisms available under the Act to strengthen ECEC for immigrant children.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

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