Research

A New Estimate of the Cost of Reversing DACA

Report Author: 
Logan Albright, Ike Brannon & M. Kevin McGee
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Using data on the age and educational outcomes of nearly 3,000 college students who are DACA recipients this study forecasts their income in the ensuing decade to estimate the total economic and fiscal impact over the next decade of allowing this cohort to remain in the country and legally pursue employment.

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Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Police, Jails, and Immigrants: How Do Immigrants and the Immigration Enforcement System Interact with Local Law Enforcement?

Report Author: 
Cristobal Ramón & Raven Quesenberry
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The Bipartisan Policy Center's review of law enforcement agencies in Atlanta, Austin, Charlotte, Denver, and Los Angeles shows that the actual operation of local law enforcement agencies and their work with immigration enforcement agencies is more complex and nuanced than is often reported in the public debate.

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Source Organization: 
Bipartisan Policy Center

Do Immigration Enforcement Programs Reduce Crime? Evidence from the 287(g) Program in North Carolina

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Andrew Forrester
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

Do Immigration Enforcement Programs Reduce Crime? Evidence from the 287(g) Program in North Carolina examines 287(g)'s implementation across multiple counties in North Carolina and identifies its impact on local crime rates and police clearance rates by exploiting time variation in regional immigration enforcement trends. The 287(g) program did not affect the crime rate in North Carolina or police clearance rates but it did boost the number of assaults against police officers.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Number of Foreign College Students Staying and Working in U.S. After Graduation Surges

Report Author: 
Neil G. Ruiz & Abby Budiman
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Number of Foreign College Students Staying and Working in U.S. After Graduation Surges presents findings based on ICE's data from the federal government's Optional Practical Training program. Between 2004 and 2016, nearly 1.5 million foreign graduates of U.S. colleges and universities obtained authorization to remain and work in the U.S. through this program. The data shows a 400% increase in foreign students graduating and working in STEM fields from 2008 to 2016.

Source Organization: 
Pew Research Center

Immigration and the Welfare State: Immigrant and Native Use Rates and Benefit Levels for Means-Tested Welfare and Entitlement Programs

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Robert Orr
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 May

Overall, immigrants are less likely to consume welfare benefits and, when they do, they generally consume a lower dollar value of benefits than native-born Americans. This appears contrary to the study conducted by the CIS (Publication 3), but Cato claims its work is more accurate because it examines individuals with immigration status, while CIS measures welfare use by households headed by immigrants (which often contain multiple native-born Americans).

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Report Author: 
Suzette Brooks Masters
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

Philanthropic Strategies to Support Refugees and Asylum Seekers profiles 10 donors' diverse approaches and strategies to supporting refugees and asylum seekers, and offers key lessons gleaned from their experience. These profiles are designed to provide a roadmap for supporting refugees, asylum seekers, and unaccompanied children seeking protection in the United States and abroad.

Source Organization: 
Other

Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin

Report Author: 
Alex Nowrasteh & Michelangelo Landgrave
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jun

"Incarcerated Immigrants in 2016: Their Numbers, Demographics, and Countries of Origin" uses American Community Survey data from the U.S. Census Bureau to analyze incarcerated immigrants according to their citizenship and legal status for 2016. The data show that all immigrants—legal and illegal—are less likely to be incarcerated than native-born Americans relative to their shares of the population.

Source Organization: 
Cato Institute

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature

Report Author: 
Randy Capps, et al.
Original Date of Publication: 
2015 Sep

Implications of Immigration Enforcement Activities for the Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families: A Review of the Literature examines the evidence concerning the impacts of deportation and fear of deportation on unauthorized immigrant families and children. The economic and social instability that generally accompanies unauthorized status is further aggravated for children with a parent's deportation, with effects including psychological trauma, material hardship, residential instability, family dissolution, increased use of public benefits and, among boys, aggression.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members

Report Author: 
Laila L. Hlass & Rachel Prandini
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members details findings from a national survey of legal practitioners concerning the increased use of gang allegations against young immigrants as a means of driving up deportation numbers, at the encouragement of the Trump administration. The report suggests emerging best practices for immigration attorneys to employ in both fighting against unfounded gang allegations and working to mitigate the impact of prior gang involvement.

Source Organization: 
The Immigrant Legal Resource Center

Do Family Separation and Detention Deter Immigration?

Report Author: 
Tom K. Wong
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jul

In response to broad public backlash over his administration’s policy of separating children from their parents at the United States’ southwest border, President Donald Trump signed an executive order in June 2018 that purports to replace family separation with potentially indefinite family detention. Numerous Trump administration officials have supported such policies under the belief that they would deter families from attempting to enter the United States.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

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