Education

To Walk a Mile in Someone Else's Shoes: How Narratives Can Change Causal Attribution Through Story Exploration and Character Customization

Report Author: 
Nathan Walter, Sheila T. Murphy & Traci K Gillig
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Dec

Fictional narratives are often an effective way to deliver "prosocial messages," and storytelling has been utilized to increase empathy and understanding toward people who belong to stigmatized groups. One way in which changed attitudes can be measured is by examining the causal attributions that a reader makes. Causal attributions refer to the reader's judgments about whether internal or external characteristics are to blame for a character's negative outcomes or actions.

Source Organization: 
Other

A Way Forward for Refugees: Findings from the WES Pilot Project

Report Author: 
Denise Jillions
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

In 2017, 66 million people became refugees and asylum seekers after being displaced from their homes. World Education Services (WES), an international credential evaluation company, launched a program in 2016 called the Refugee Pilot Project, in order to test an alternative approach to verifying the academic credentials of Syrian refugees in Canada. WES started this program because refugees often have missing or incomplete documentation and their circumstances prevent them from obtaining verified documents to comply with WES's standard procedure.

Source Organization: 
Other

Dominican Immigrants in the United States

Report Author: 
Jie Zong & Jeanne Batalova
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Apr

This "Spotlight" report details the major demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Dominican immigrants in the U.S. based on census and Department of Homeland Security data. Among data points covered in the report are: educational attainment, labor force participation, income and poverty levels, immigration pathways and naturalization rates, health coverage, and remittance levels.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Opportunity Lost: The Economic Benefit of retaining Foreign-Born Students in Local Economies

Report Author: 
Giovanni Peri, Gaetano Basso, and Sara McElmurry
Original Date of Publication: 
2016 Apr

This study measures the likelihood that three categories of foreign-born individuals (F-1 visa holders, lawful permanent residents, and undocumented individuals) will be employed five years after graduating from college. Described by the authors as the "first-of-its-kind quantification of college-to-employment rates," the study devotes special attention to the growing numbers of foreign students, i.e. F-1 visa holders -- two-thirds of whom are studying in high-demand STEM fields. As the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Data Matters

Report Author: 
Jeanne Batalova, Andriy Shymonyak, and Michelle Mittelstadt
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

This report, which researchers may want to bookmark, contains a long list of easily accessible online data sources providing a broad range of information on the foreign-born and immigration, including demographic characteristics, English proficiency, health and health care access, labor force characteristics, annual immigration admissions, undocumented immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers, temporary humanitarian statuses, immigration enforcement, state-based policies, public opinion about immigration and immigrants, and much more.

Report File: 
Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Socioeconomic Integration of U.S. Immigrant Groups over the Long Term: The Second Generation and Beyond

Report Author: 
Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

Large-scale immigration raises questions about the social and economic progress of new arrivals, their U.S.-born children and the third generation. Some observers suggest that the sheer size and geographic concentration of recent immigration could hinder immigrants' social and economic integration. The authors of this paper examine some of the available data on this question, as well as methodological problems associated with the data. The Current Population Survey (CPS) has nativity questions about the respondent and her/his parents that may be used to assess generational change.

Source Organization: 
Other

What Works: Innovative Approaches to Improving Refugee Integration

Report Author: 
Silva Mathema
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The Trump administration has proposed funding cuts to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP), which will destabilize the current infrastructure for resettling and integrating refugees.

Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

Supporting Dual Language Learner Success in Superdiverse PreK-3 Classrooms: The Sobrato Early Academic Language Model

Report Author: 
Anya Hurwitz & Laurie Olsen
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

While the characteristics of monolingual, bilingual, or dual language classrooms for young children are widely understood and well covered in the educational literature, there appears to be an information void regarding the "superdiverse" classroom, defined by this study as one "with at least five language groups represented, and without a critical mass of any one language group in a classroom that would make dual-language/bilingual instruction feasible." Too often in these settings, the importance of primary language skills to English language development is overlooked or discounted.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

Language of the Classroom: Dual Language Learners in Head Start, Public Pre-K, and Private Preschool Programs

Report Author: 
Megina Baker & Mariela Páez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Mar

This report is one in a series of three reports produced by MPI examining the implications of "superdiverse" communities for early childhood education and care programs and systems. As of 2013, more than one in three children in the U.S. spoke a language other than English at home.

Source Organization: 
Migration Policy Institute

U.S. Colleges are Losing International Students: Why It's Happening and Why It's a Problem

Report Author: 
Jake Varn
Original Date of Publication: 
2017 Oct

The United States has long drawn students from all over the world to attend its world-class colleges and universities. However, in 2016, international enrollment dropped for the first time since 2005. In this report, policy analyst Jake Varn argues that this decline should be cause for alarm. He points out that international students are vital to the higher education ecosystem and the larger economy: they create a diverse student body and are a significant source of revenue for universities as they pay full tuition and often do not receive financial aid.

Source Organization: 
Other

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