Civil Rights

What DACA Recipients Stand to Lose—and What States Can Do About It

Report Author: 
Silva Mathema
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Sep

Although the burden is on Congress to pass legislation that provides Dreamers a pathway to citizenship, states can take action in the meantime to protect them and help ensure that once Congress does its job, these young people will have everything they need to realize their full potential.

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Source Organization: 
Center for American Progress

Detaining Families: A Study of Asylum Adjudication in Family Detention

Report Author: 
Ingrid Eagly, Esq., Steven Shafer, Esq. & Jana Whalley, Esq.
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Aug

The United States currently detains more protection-seeking families than any nation in the world. Since 2001, parents and their children have been held at various times in five different detention facilities in New Mexico, Texas, and Pennsylvania, as they seek asylum in the United States. The number of detention beds reserved exclusively for families has ballooned since the first facility opened in 2001. Between 2001 and 2016, capacity reserved exclusively for detaining families increased by an astronomical 3,400 percent.

Source Organization: 
American Immigration Council

Tearing Down the Second Wall: Ending USCIS’s Backlog of Citizenship Applications and Expanding Access to Naturalization for Immigrants: Third Addendum to Second Wall Report

Report Author: 
Diego Iñiguez-López
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jul

The National Partnership for New Americans (NPNA) released a third addendum to its Building a Second Wall report, which documents the growing backlog of naturalization applications since the start of the Trump presidency. The author suggests this backlog may be a “critical tool in the Trump administration’s attacks on immigrant communities” -- a tool designed to delay or deny citizenship to eligible immigrants.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Court Appearances Rates

Report Author: 
Olga Byrne
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

As Congress and the Trump Administration debate immigration policy reforms, one critical—and often misrepresented—piece of information is the extent to which individuals in immigration removal proceedings comply with their court appearance obligations. Based on available data, it is clear that immigrants appear for their immigration court hearings at high rates, particularly when they have legal representation or case management support, and accurate information related to the court process.

Source Organization: 
Other

Police, Jails, and Immigrants: How Do Immigrants and the Immigration Enforcement System Interact with Local Law Enforcement?

Report Author: 
Cristobal Ramón & Raven Quesenberry
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

The Bipartisan Policy Center's review of law enforcement agencies in Atlanta, Austin, Charlotte, Denver, and Los Angeles shows that the actual operation of local law enforcement agencies and their work with immigration enforcement agencies is more complex and nuanced than is often reported in the public debate.

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Source Organization: 
Bipartisan Policy Center

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members

Report Author: 
Laila L. Hlass & Rachel Prandini
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Feb

Deportation by Any Means Necessary: How Immigration Officials Are Labeling Immigrant Youth as Gang Members details findings from a national survey of legal practitioners concerning the increased use of gang allegations against young immigrants as a means of driving up deportation numbers, at the encouragement of the Trump administration. The report suggests emerging best practices for immigration attorneys to employ in both fighting against unfounded gang allegations and working to mitigate the impact of prior gang involvement.

Source Organization: 
The Immigrant Legal Resource Center

Immigration Governance for the Twenty-First Century

Report Author: 
Ruth Ellen Wasem
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Arguing that "immigration is not a program to be administered" but rather "a phenomenon to be managed," Ruth Ellen Wasem, former immigration specialist for the Congressional Research Service and now a Professor of Public Policy at the University of Texas, reviews the "checkered past" of immigration policy over the last century and, despite numerous efforts to reform the system, the "fragmented" and "diffuse" nature of immigration governance today. "Today the US system of immigration governance," she writes, "is scattered across the federal government, with no clear chain of command..."

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation

Report Author: 
Melina Juárez, Bárbara Gómez-Aguiñaga & Sonia P. Bettez
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

"Twenty Years after IIRIRA: The Rise of Immigrant Detention and its Effects on Latinx Communities Across the Nation" argues that corporate interests, specifically CoreCivic and the GEO group - two companies that operate nine out of the 10 largest immigrant detention centers in the U.S.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

Freezing Out Justice: How Immigration Arrests at Courthouses are Undermining the Justice System

Report Author: 
American Civil Liberties Union
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Since the beginning of the Trump administration, immigration authorities have significantly increased their enforcement activities at courthouses - by 1,200 percent in New York in 2017 alone.

Source Organization: 
Other

Immigration Detention, Inc.

Report Author: 
Denise Gilman & Luis A. Romero
Original Date of Publication: 
2018 Jan

Some 350,000 immigrants are detained each year by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and about 30,000 immigrants are in detention on any day. Private prison corporations increasingly manage and profit from rising immigrant detention. Managing immigrant detention is a money-making business for corporations like the GEO Group, which opened a family detention facility in 2014 and soon after had $30 million in increased quarterly profits. The CoreCivic prison company had $245 million in revenue in one year from family detention.

Source Organization: 
Center for Migration Studies

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